Identifying Garage Door Springs

If your garage door spring is broken, getting in or out can become downright impossible. In order for us to successfully sort you as quickly as possible, we need to know what kind of springs we are dealing with.

Location of Springs

If you stand where your car normally sits with the door closed, the location of the springs will tell us the most about what we’re dealing with.

Please take a photo (or photos, if needed) for us and include it with your Service Request.

Above the door in the center?

Single or paired spring above door, usually in center

You have either a single or paired Torsion Spring. Please let us know if it is a single or pair.

At the back of the horizontal tracks?

Rear Torsion Springs can be found behind the door (closer to the center of garage) when the door is open.

Above the door on the right or left (both for a 16′ door)?

Non-standard springs, these Easy Wind or Easy Set Springs require special ordering – which can take a week or more – and will require multiple trips for us to replace. We will quote you for converting to torsion springs for faster repair both now and in the future.

Outside horizontal tracks on both right and left?

Extension Springs ID Photo

Extension Springs are an older, though very common variety of springs. They are considered unsafe and we will quote you for converting to torsion springs for safer garage door operations.

A silver tube over the door and no visible spring?

Torque Tubes have no visible spring(s)

Torque Tubes are another non-standard spring that require special ordering – which can take a week or more – and will take multiple trips to replace. We will quote you for converting to torsion springs for faster repair both now and in the future.

Single or paired silver tube from Overhead Door?

These are Overhead Door Company’s old Armor Tight springs. They are considered obsolete and cannot be repaired. We can convert this to torsion springs for continued operation.

We do recommend changing paired springs together. There are multiple reasons for this, but one of the main ones is your cost – a single service call to replace two springs is much less expensive than two service calls.